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'Do Not Resuscitate' orders may get more oversight

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A guardianship bill introduced in the Florida legislature in November is looking to give more oversight for "Do Not Resuscitate" orders given by guardians of incapacitated persons. (MGN)

A guardianship bill introduced in the Florida legislature in November is looking to give more oversight for "Do Not Resuscitate" orders given by guardians of incapacitated persons.

The bill, introduced by Senator Kathleen Passidomo (R) and co-introduced by Senators Linda Stewart and Perry Thurston, would expand factors for a court to consider when appointing a guardian and would prohibit professional guardians from petitioning for their own appointment except under certain circumstances.

According to WKMG in Orlando, the bill was drafted on the heels of a criminal investigation into how former Orlando-based guardian Rebecca Fierle handled her clients' medical and financial affairs and if she broke any laws by ordering "Do Not Resuscitate" orders on clients.

"For those individuals who did not actually sign their own advance care directive, there was a gap in the statute. It only requires two physicians to confirm that would be appropriate - and the guardian could then go ahead and issue the order - and did not need to get court approval," Senator Passidomo told WKMG in a phone interview.

The bill would also amend what the court looks into in order for a guardian to be appointed, including the person's eligibility and any potential conflicts of interest, among other qualifications.

As of last Thursday, the bill is pending reference review in committee, but so far, has passed not had a single person vote against it in any committee.

Read the full bill here:




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